Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque & Eid ul Azha, Photo essay


Tomorrow is the 2nd highest festival of the Islamic Calender, the Eid ul Azha. At this occasion, I decided to present a photo essay of the Abhu Dhabi Grand Mosque, after an introductory blogpost yesterday

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

It is said, what better time would be to be there, at the Mosque now at the time of a festival, the Eid ul Azha

Mosque – few facts

  • Abu Dhabi Grand MosqueThe design of the Sheikh Zayed Mosque has been inspired by both Mughal and Moorish mosque architecture, particularly the Badshahi Mosque in Lahore, Pakistan and the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca, Morocco being direct influences. The dome layout and floorplan of the mosque was inspired by the Badshahi Mosque.
  • It features 82 domes, over a 1,000 columns, 24 carat gold gilded chandeliers and the world’s largest hand knotted carpet.
  • The main prayer hall is dominated by one of the world’s largest chandeliers –10 metres in diameter, 15 metres in height and weighing twelve tonnes.

Capacity

  • The mosque is large enough to accommodate over 40,000 worshipers, 7000 in the mina prayer hall and 1500 in the ones in the halls for men and females. The main prayer hall is open for Friday prayers and festival prayers, the daily prayers are held in the smaller prayer halls and the main prayer hall is closed for prayers, which I think is objectionable!

Materials

  • Abu Dhabi Grand MosqueThere are four minarets on the four corners of the courtyard which rise about 107 m (351 ft) in height. The courtyard, with its floral design, measures about 17,000 m2 (180,000 sq ft),and is considered to be the largest example of marble mosaic in the world.[1]
    • Sivec (Marble) from Prilep, Macedonia was used on the external cladding (115,119 m2 (1,239,130 sq ft)
    • Lasa from Laas, South Tyrol, Italy was used in the internal elevations
    • Makrana from Makrana India was used in the annexes and offices
    • Aquabiana and Biano from Italy
    • East White and Ming Green from China

Some other key points

  • Chandelier of Grand Mosque, Abu DhabiCarpets are from Iran
  • Chandeliers from Germany
  • The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque’s design and construction ‘unites the world’, using artisans and materials from many countries including Italy, Germany, Morocco, Pakistan, India, Turkey, Malaysia, Iran, China, United Kingdom, New Zealand, Greece and United Arab Emirates.

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque – Visting Times

Saturday to Thursday: 9:00 am – 10:00p.m.

Friday: (after prayers) 4:30 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Look up the current opening times: http://www.szgmc.ae/en/mosque-opening-hours

Dressing code

For men and women: modest dress

Women: are handed out Abayas (=black overdress), if the dress code is not conforming with the requirements. For women a loose, full sleeved, no transparent top, with trousers and a scarf to cover your head should suffice.

Conduct in the mosque 

Be respectful to the praying people and let them pray in peace. Don’t disturb them with loud discussions and taking pictures!

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque: Getting there

http://www.szgmc.ae/en/getting-to-the-mosque

Entrance Gates & Car Parking

Visitors can enter the mosque from the SOUTH Gate car park entrance and there is ample parking available.
Taxi
Abu Dhabi’s TRANSAD offer pick-up services by calling their hotline (toll free) number 600535353 or www.transad.ae. You may walk to the taxi designated area in the north car park and wait.
Bus Services
Abu Dhabi has a comprehensive public bus service.  The closest bus station is located approximately 10 minutes walking distance and operates services that take you inside the city.

 
 

What is Eid ul Azha

Eid Al Adha: This is an important 4-day religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide to honor the willingness of the prophet ʾIbrāhīm (Abraham) to sacrifice his young firstborn son Ismā’īl (Ishmael) as an act of submission to God, and his son’s acceptance of the sacrifice before God intervened to provide Abraham with a lamb to sacrifice instead. The celebration starts on the 10th of Dhul Hijja and start with the descent from the Mount of Arafa at the Hajj, one of the 5 pillars of Islam.

Eid ul Adha is one of the 2 highest festivals in Islam. Whereas Eid al-Fitr marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan – the Islamic holy month of dawn-to-sunset fasting, Eid al-Adha means ‘solemn festivity’.

Tomorrow is Eid ul azha and I wish everyone celebrating a blessed Eid! 

Have you been to Abu Dhabi at a festival time? How did you spend the time there?

top

abudhabimosque-3

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Gran Mosque

Abu Dhabi Gran Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque, ckad by marble from Macedonia

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Abu Dhabi Grand Mosque

Gold clad decorations of the pillars

Gold clad decorations of the pillars

Abu Dhabi Mosque: Ceiling decorations

Abu Dhabi Mosque: Ceiling decorations

Ablution rooms for women

Ablution rooms for women

Iznik tile decorations at the women's washrooms

Iznik tile decorations at the women’s washrooms

women's prayer room

women’s prayer room

Chandeliers and florals designs at the entrance of the main prayer hall

Chandeliers and florals designs at the entrance of the main prayer hall

Chandelier of Grand Mosque, Abu Dhabi

Chandelier of Grand Mosque, Abu Dhabi

Abu Dhani Mosque, insode the mainhall

Abu Dhabi Mosque – inside

The mihrab - the direction of prayers and the Mimbar- where the Imam gives his sermon

The mihrab – the direction of prayers and the Mimbar- where the Imam gives his sermon

The Mimbar- where  the Imam gives his sermon

The Mimbar- where the Imam gives his sermon

Again, wishing the celebrating a blessed Eid ul Azha

Related Post

Ishitaunblogged wrote a fabulous piece on the Abu Dhabi Grand mosque, saying, what better time would be to visit the Grand mosque than now, meant at Eid ul Azha

top

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s